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The Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education of North Carolina 
Holocaust Speakers Bureau 


International Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27th,  is an international memorial day that commemorates the genocide that resulted in the deaths of 6 million Jews and 11 million others, by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. It was designated by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 60/7 on November 1, 2005.  The date marks the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau and is meant to honor the victims of Nazism. The same resolution supports the development of educational programs to remember the Holocaust and to prevent further genocide. 

To learn more about the Holocaust and to access our resources, please visit the resources tab on this website. Also, you can view one of our five documentary shorts to hear and see firsthand, eyewitness testimony of a survivor.  You can also learn about our upcoming speaking engagements and view photos from our past events.

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Resolution 60/7 not only establishes January 27 as “International Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust,” it also rejects any form of Holocaust denial. The resolution encourages member states of the UN to actively preserve sites that the Nazis used during the "Final Solution" (for example, killing centers, concentration camps, and prisons.) Drawing from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the resolution condemns all forms of “religious intolerance, incitement, harassment or violence against persons or communities based on ethnic origin or religious belief” throughout the world.

In addition to observing International Holocaust Remembrance Day, many countries have established their own remembrance days that are often connected to events from the Holocaust. For example, Argentina legislated April 19, the day of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, as the national Day for Cultural Diversity. Hungary designated April 16 as National Holocaust Remembrance Day, commemorating the establishment of the ghetto in Munkács. In 1979, the United States Congress established Days of Remembrance that usually take place between April and early May to commemorate victims of the Nazi regime. The US Days of Remembrance correspond to Yom Ha-Shoah, Israel's annual Holocaust Remembrance Day.

The Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education of North Carolina

(the Holocaust Speakers Bureau)

inspires students and members of our community to respect the dignity of all human beings by

teaching the challenging topics of the Holocaust, genocide, and tolerance. We work with schools, museums, libraries and houses of worship to develop age-appropriate materials, presentations and programs.