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The Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education of North Carolina 
Holocaust Speakers Bureau 


This year, beginning on the eve of April 23 until the eve of April 24, we observe Yom Hashoah, the annual day set aside to commemorate the Holocaust. The United States Congress established this day in 1980 to remember and reflect upon the events of the Holocaust, which took place a little more than 70 years ago.
 
Each year, during this time of remembrance, local and state governments, military bases, various workplaces, organizations, and schools hold events to remember the victims, honor the survivors, and pay tribute to those righteous individuals who resisted evil and rescued innocent people from harm, starvation, and death.
 
You may wonder why the date for Yom Hashoah is different from the date of International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom Hashoah) was first established in 1951 by the Israeli parliament (Knesset). The date was chosen to coincide with the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and with the liberation of the concentration camps in Western Europe. In 2005, the United Nations established January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. January 27, 1945 was the day that Auschwitz-Birkenau was liberated by Soviet troops.
 
Today, cruel acts of terrorism, hatred and bigotry occur on a daily basis throughout the world. These acts motivate us to use the remembrance of the Holocaust to promote positive change and create an environment in which we can all feel safe, regardless of our religion, ethnicity, race, or sexual orientation.
 
To learn more about the Holocaust and to access our resources, please visit the resources tab on this website. Also, you can view one of our five documentary shorts to hear and see firsthand, eyewitness testimony of a survivor.  You can also learn about our upcoming speaking engagements and view photos from our past events.

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A bunker used by the Jewish resistance during the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (April 19–May 16 1943).

 





























Yom Hashoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day)

The Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education of North Carolina (the Holocaust Speakers Bureau) inspires students and members of our community to respect the dignity of all human beings by teaching the challenging topics of the Holocaust, genocide, and tolerance. We work with schools, museums, libraries and houses of worship to develop age-appropriate materials, presentations and programs.